Advances in Engineering Innovation

Advances in Engineering Innovation

Vol. 3, 23 October 2023


Open Access | Article

The emergence and need for explainable AI

Harmon Lee Bruce Chia * 1
1 Capitol Technology University

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Advances in Engineering Innovation, Vol. 3
Published 23 October 2023. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Harmon Lee Bruce Chia. The emergence and need for explainable AI. AEI (2023) Vol. 3. DOI: 10.54254/2977-3903/3/2023023.

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems, particularly deep learning models, have revolutionized numerous sectors with their unprecedented performance capabilities. However, the intricate structures of these models often result in a "black-box" characterization, making their decisions difficult to understand and trust. Explainable AI (XAI) emerges as a solution, aiming to unveil the inner workings of complex AI systems. This paper embarks on a comprehensive exploration of prominent XAI techniques, evaluating their effectiveness, comprehensibility, and robustness across diverse datasets. Our findings highlight that while certain techniques excel in offering transparent explanations, others provide a cohesive understanding across varied models. The study accentuates the importance of crafting AI systems that seamlessly marry performance with interpretability, fostering trust and facilitating broader AI adoption in decision-critical domains.

Keywords

explainable AI, deep learning, interpretability, trust in AI, model transparency

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
ISBN (Print)
ISBN (Online)
Published Date
23 October 2023
Series
Advances in Engineering Innovation
ISSN (Print)
2977-3903
ISSN (Online)
2977-3911
DOI
10.54254/2977-3903/3/2023023
Copyright
23 October 2023
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated